Survey Says: Brits Favor PEGI Ratings

June 19, 2008 -

A survey conducted on behalf of the UK video game industry holds that two-thirds of British adults favor a single European game rating system.

MCV UK reports that ELSPA, which has been lobbying for the PEGI rating system over the BBFC, certainly found the results to its liking. The BBFC, of course, is best known to gamers for its 2007 banning of Manhunt 2, which was was later overturned by a British High Court.

Of the survey results, ELSPA Director General Paul Jackson (left) commented:

The Byron Review conclusions put much emphasis on the need for a clear age ratings system in the UK. This YouGov research shows us that, like all of ELSPA’s members, the majority of British adults and parents wish to see as the system that is standardised across Europe. We believe this demonstrates that in order to protect children it is essential that whichever classification body is chosen following the Government’s promised public consultation of the Byron Review, the decision is based on its ability as a games classifier both on and off line. It is also important that it is recognised across Europe.
 

Michael Cashman, a senior member of the European Parliament’s Justice, Home Affairs and Civil Liberties Committee, weighed in as well:

I am not surprised that most Brits believe it is vital that we are signed-up to a pan-European rating system. Many buy their games when they are away, and others download content from European games companies. These are trends which will inevitably continue. PEGI and PEGI Online offer security when UK residents buy games from the continent– and when visiting Europeans buy games from us during their visits. PEGI rates the suitability of games for all ages, which is very important. The PEGI system was even partly devised by representatives of the British video games industry, and today it offers comprehensive protection for children both at home and overseas. I welcome the latest YouGov findings.

 


Comments

Re: Survey Says: Brits Favor PEGI Ratings

Point taken :D Hey at least I didn't mention banana regulations! ;)

Gift.

Re: Survey Says: Brits Favor PEGI Ratings

Is there any actual information on the survey itself or the way in which the data was collated?

Re: Survey Says: Brits Favor PEGI Ratings

Thats all well and good but there's a slight problem with all this. If the ESRB and other systems are 'adaquite and working' then why are there still so many people calling for bans on games and other silliness like that. The reason is because these rating systems are so often ignored by the very people they'er meant to inform. When Mr.Anderson goes out and buys GTA4 for his 6 year old without a second thought and then sees the game himself, breaks the disk and pitches a fit in public about all this, all it's a symptom of is bad parenting. If people don't start taking responicblity for this on their own and figuring out "hey I should pay attention to what my lil johnny wants to play so I don't warp him." then all of this rating system stuff is useless.  For the record, I like the ESRB and this rating system of the europeans seems pretty solid too. But seriously unless parents follow suit and start using it there's little point.

 
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TechnogeekIn large part, though, that's an extension of the level of unjust deference given to police in general. Kind of hard to find any real grievances to defend against when the organizational culture views "complains about coworker" as worse than "murderer".07/07/2015 - 8:45pm
TechnogeekThat's a police union.07/07/2015 - 8:43pm
TechnogeekNo, police unions are worse by far. Imagine every negative stereotype about unions, then add "we can get away with anything".07/07/2015 - 8:43pm
Goth_SkunkeZeek: No, I do not agree they are union members.07/07/2015 - 7:48pm
E. Zachary KnightTeachers unions are just as bad as police unions, except of course you are far less likely to be killed by a teacher on duty than you are a cop. But they also protect bad teachers from being fired.07/07/2015 - 6:29pm
E. Zachary KnightGoth, so you agree they are still union members. Thankfully we have a first ammendment that protects people from being forced to join groups they don't support (in most cases any way.)07/07/2015 - 6:27pm
E. Zachary KnightAh, police unions. The reason why cops can't get fired when they beat a defenseless mentally ill homeless person to death. Or when they throw a grenade into a baby's crib. Or when theykill people they were called in to help not hurt themselves.07/07/2015 - 6:26pm
Goth_SkunkeZeek: Non-union employees have no right to attend meetings or union convention/AGM, or influence policy. The only time they get to vote is whether or not to strike.07/07/2015 - 6:24pm
Infophile(cont'd) about non-union police officers being given hell until they joined the union.07/07/2015 - 4:58pm
InfophileParadoxically, the drive in the US to get rid of unions seems to have left only the most corrupt surviving. They seem to be the only ones that can find ways to browbeat employees into joining when paying dues isn't mandatory. I've heard some stories ...07/07/2015 - 4:57pm
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TechnogeekWhat's best for the employee tends to be good for the employer; other way around, not so much. So long as that's the case, there's going to be a far stronger incentive for management to behave in such a way that invites retalitation than for the union to.07/07/2015 - 3:10pm
TechnogeekTeachers' unions? State legislatures. UAW? Just look at GM's middle management.07/07/2015 - 3:05pm
TechnogeekIn many ways it seems that the worse a union tends to behave, the worse that the company's management has behaved in the past.07/07/2015 - 3:02pm
james_fudgeCharity starts at home ;)07/07/2015 - 2:49pm
james_fudgeSo mandatory charity? That sounds shitty to me07/07/2015 - 2:49pm
E. Zachary KnightGoth, if Union dues are automatically withdrawn, then there is no such thing as a non-union employee.07/07/2015 - 2:38pm
Goth_Skunka mutually agreed upon charity instead.07/07/2015 - 2:33pm
Goth_Skunkyou enjoy the benefits of working in a union environment. If working in a union is against your religious beliefs or just something you wholeheartedly object to, dues will still be deducted from your pay, but you can instruct that they be directed towards07/07/2015 - 2:33pm
Goth_SkunkBasically, if you are employed in a business where employees are represented by a union for the purposes of collective bargaining, whether or not you are a union member, you will have union dues deducted from your pay, since regardless of membership,07/07/2015 - 2:32pm
 

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