“Teenager’s Dream” Used in Army Training

November 16, 2010 -

Wired’s Danger Room columnist recently took a trip to the Association of the U.S. Army conference held in Washington D.C. to get a look at the latest and greatest gadgets that contractors are developing for America’s armed forces.

Among the items was a videogame, dubbed Call of Duty: Afghanistan by Wired, which allows trainees to work on a variety of skills, including maneuvering and leadership tactics.

The scene in question features a model of Afghanistan’s Ganjgak Valley with participants taking part in “key leader engagement training,” or military personnel interviewing local dignitaries as they attempt to mine information.

U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command’s Mark Covey, who was named by Fast Company as one of the 100 Most Creative People in Business for 2010, described the simulation stating, “They are learning about the area of operation they are preparing to go to. At the same time, they are also learning how to do small arms tactics in this type of environment.”

The leader, be it a company commander or platoon leader, can also come into the training and be afforded a “God’s eye view,” which allows them to monitor how well their charges are performing in the simulation. An “after action review capability” allows the leaders and field personnel to gather and critique the mission.

The technology was described as “a relatively cheap piece of equipment,” as “it’s nothing more than a desktop computer tied to three different monitors.”


Comments

Re: “Teenager’s Dream” Used in Army Training

Notice that no where does it say that it's a commercial video game (it isn't), nor is it 'training them to kill'. It's a purpose-built military simulation, that's what we need to remember.

Re: “Teenager’s Dream” Used in Army Training

 anyone wanna play COD Black Ops? PSN tag: JitteryJordan

Re: “Teenager’s Dream” Used in Army Training

The technology was described as “a relatively cheap piece of equipment,” as “it’s nothing more than a desktop computer tied to three different monitors.”

I remember early versions of Doom using the same thing for surround-vision

岩「if Phyllis Schlafly wants to undo Women's Rights, she should lead by example and get back in the kitchen」

岩「…I can see why Hasselbeck's worried about fake guns killing fake people. afterall, she's a fake journalist on a fake news channel」

Re: “Teenager’s Dream” Used in Army Training

Cool!

However I am quite sure some of those "video-games are being secretly used to train our kids for war" nuts will want their say on this :P

---------

James Fletcher, member of ECA Canada

 
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