RIAA Targets Spain, Canada, for Piracy Watch List

February 18, 2011 -

The Recording Industry Association of America and its partners at the International Intellectual Property Alliance recently submitted their ‘piracy watchlist’ recommendations to the Office of the US Trade Representative. The RIAA pointed to two countries as being the worst of the worst when it comes to intellectual property theft: Spain and our comrades to the north - Canada.

This is particularly interesting because this week Spain passed a tough new law to combat piracy. The Sinde law (nicknamed for its sponsor) is aimed at shutting down file-sharing sites that traffic in illegal downloads. Even though the public and some in the Spanish movie industry opposed the law, it will become the rule of the land by summer, says TorrentFreak. But the RIAA claims this is just a baby step and that even more needs to be done to combat theft.

In their advice to the US Trade Representative, the groups included Spain in the Priority Watch List, the highest category for countries that are considered to be ‘piracy havens’. Spain is joined by Canada, Russia and China. All of these countries are considered major threats to the US entertainment industries.

These new recommendations from the RIAA will be considered by the USTR when it prepares its annual Special 301 Report. The report identifies countries that "obstruct or deny proper copyright enforcement." The RIAA recommended Spain because "file-sharing sites have been ruled as operating within the boundaries of the law."

“The sky-high Internet piracy levels in Spain can be attributed to government policies that have created an Internet-wide safe harbor for infringing activities. Spanish enforcement authorities have established the de facto decriminalization of illegal downloading of content distributed via P2P file-sharing,” the RIAA argues.

Another issue the RIAA wants addressed by Spain is the lack of ability to identify and report copyright infringers: "Spain’s laws fail to meet the minimum requirements of the EU E-Commerce Directive regarding liability for ISPs, or to establish the necessary tools to obtain the identity of the direct infringer," the group claims.

Canada is another candidate for the 2011 priority watch list, according to the RIAA, because of Canada’s slow progress on revising their copyright laws. The RIAA calls our neighbor to the north "home to some of the world’s most popular illegitimate Internet sites, including illegitimate P2P download and streaming sites."

The RIAA and IIPA recommendations include Canada, Spain and 11 other countries on the priority watch list of the 2011 Special 301 Report. We will see who makes the cut in a couple of weeks.

Source: TorrentFreak


Comments

Re: RIAA Targets Spain, Canada, for Piracy Watch List

Dear RIAA,

From my friends, family and myself, both here in Canada and in your own lands, we wish to tell you a great big f**k you. Kindly go die in a corner, your time has passed. You are neither a good defender for your industries nor a positive force for the consumers.

Thank you.

Re: RIAA Targets Spain, Canada, for Piracy Watch List

Having the RIAA saying to us "We're watching you, Canada" isn't scary, it's creepy. Like that old man in Family Guy.

----------

Living in Canada can be a very good thing, you know. We enjoy the universal healthcare and gun-free environment of an European country while getting all of our games released at the same time as in the US.

Living in Canada is awesome. We enjoy the universal healthcare and gun-free environment of a European country while getting all of our games released at the same time as the US.

Re: RIAA Targets Spain, Canada, for Piracy Watch List

Normally I try to post something a little more mature, but the only response I can think of to this article is...

I invite the RIAA to kiss my maple leaf clad ass. 

Re: RIAA Targets Spain, Canada, for Piracy Watch List

"All of these countries are considered major threats to the US entertainment industries."

I find this unintentionally hilarious, because Hollywood went out of their way in the early days of film to keep Canada from building its own industry.  In other countries, national cinema accounts for as much as 20% of the screentime; up here it's something like 5%.  But now, with their economy in a nosedive, they're scared to death that more and more upstart production companies will move up here to shoot in Calgary and Toronto.

Payback's a bitch, America. >:D

---
Fangamer

---
Fangamer

Re: RIAA Targets Spain, Canada, for Piracy Watch List

Indeed.  Fortunately, our politicians are at least on record as saying that they basically ignore the US 301 list because it's made up by Big Content themselves.  The current copyright bill on the table in Canada will likely die if we end up in a federal election in the spring (again), but we're making much better progress towards a balanced bill.

Re: RIAA Targets Spain, Canada, for Piracy Watch List

Haha, I remember the Progressive Conservative response to Canada being added to the list. It translated into a very polite "Screw you". Then they bumped up funding to filming done in Canada and  turned away the idea of charging people a fee on all recordable media (including MP3 players, USB memory, hard drives, etc).

 
Forgot your password?
Username :
Password :

Poll

Which group is more ethically challenged?:

Shout box

You're not permitted to post shouts.
Andrew EisenThe original movie's Ecto-1 was a '59 Cadillac. I don't know cars but Twitter tells me this is an '84 Cadillac. The original Ghostbusters came out in '84. Cute!07/08/2015 - 1:14am
Andrew EisenHere's the back side: https://twitter.com/paulfeig/status/61862135787884953607/08/2015 - 1:07am
Andrew EisenNew Ecto-1! https://twitter.com/paulfeig/status/61860585924191846507/08/2015 - 12:58am
Goth_Skunk"The New Totalitarians Are Here" from The Federalist. http://ow.ly/Pjz3b07/07/2015 - 11:31pm
MattsworknameThere was a time in america when we needed unions and they served a good purpose, but that time hasnt been tbe case for about 20 years or more. The same could be said of our current system for teachers in higher educatoin,but thats a whole nother story07/07/2015 - 10:22pm
TechnogeekIn large part, though, that's an extension of the level of unjust deference given to police in general. Kind of hard to find any real grievances to defend against when the organizational culture views "complains about coworker" as worse than "murderer".07/07/2015 - 8:45pm
TechnogeekThat's a police union.07/07/2015 - 8:43pm
TechnogeekNo, police unions are worse by far. Imagine every negative stereotype about unions, then add "we can get away with anything".07/07/2015 - 8:43pm
Goth_SkunkeZeek: No, I do not agree they are union members.07/07/2015 - 7:48pm
E. Zachary KnightTeachers unions are just as bad as police unions, except of course you are far less likely to be killed by a teacher on duty than you are a cop. But they also protect bad teachers from being fired.07/07/2015 - 6:29pm
E. Zachary KnightGoth, so you agree they are still union members. Thankfully we have a first ammendment that protects people from being forced to join groups they don't support (in most cases any way.)07/07/2015 - 6:27pm
E. Zachary KnightAh, police unions. The reason why cops can't get fired when they beat a defenseless mentally ill homeless person to death. Or when they throw a grenade into a baby's crib. Or when theykill people they were called in to help not hurt themselves.07/07/2015 - 6:26pm
Goth_SkunkeZeek: Non-union employees have no right to attend meetings or union convention/AGM, or influence policy. The only time they get to vote is whether or not to strike.07/07/2015 - 6:24pm
Infophile(cont'd) about non-union police officers being given hell until they joined the union.07/07/2015 - 4:58pm
InfophileParadoxically, the drive in the US to get rid of unions seems to have left only the most corrupt surviving. They seem to be the only ones that can find ways to browbeat employees into joining when paying dues isn't mandatory. I've heard some stories ...07/07/2015 - 4:57pm
Matthew WilsonI am old school on this. I believe its a conflict of interest to have public sector unions. that being said, I do not have a positive look on unions in general.07/07/2015 - 3:59pm
TechnogeekWhat's best for the employee tends to be good for the employer; other way around, not so much. So long as that's the case, there's going to be a far stronger incentive for management to behave in such a way that invites retalitation than for the union to.07/07/2015 - 3:10pm
TechnogeekTeachers' unions? State legislatures. UAW? Just look at GM's middle management.07/07/2015 - 3:05pm
TechnogeekIn many ways it seems that the worse a union tends to behave, the worse that the company's management has behaved in the past.07/07/2015 - 3:02pm
james_fudgeCharity starts at home ;)07/07/2015 - 2:49pm
 

Be Heard - Contact Your Politician