June is Entertainment Ratings & Labeling Awareness Month

June 1, 2011 -

With summer vacation on its way later this month in most parts of the country and with children looking for things to do when they aren't outside, it makes perfect sense that June has been declared Entertainment Ratings & Labeling Awareness Month by DiMA, EMA, NARM, and NATO (no, not THAT NATO).

The Digital Media Association (DiMA), Entertainment Merchants Association (EMA), National Association of Recording Merchandisers (NARM), and National Association of Theatre Owners are calling on theatre owners and retailers of movies, music, and video games to highlight and emphasize the motion picture and video game ratings and music labeling systems to their customers.

“Entertainment Ratings and Labeling Awareness Month” is sponsored by the four trade associations through their Coalition of Entertainment Retail Trade Associations (CERTA). It is declared annually to promote the use of entertainment ratings and labels by encouraging retailers to review their ratings and labeling education and enforcement policies, reemphasizing those policies to their employees, and educating their customers about the movie and video game ratings and music labeling systems and store policies.

“There is a bounty of wonderful entertainment options for people of all ages, and the music labeling and motion picture and video game rating systems can help parents choose the right entertainment for their children,” CERTA declared. “While the decision as to what is appropriate for a particular child ultimately rests with the parent, retailers can and do play an important role in empowering parents with the tools necessary to make those decisions: the entertainment ratings and labeling systems.”

Retailers can learn more about CERTA and the entertainment industry’s ratings and labeling systems at www.ERLAM.org. For more on the Parental Advisory Program, click here.


Comments

Re: June is Entertainment Ratings & Labeling Awareness Month

Ironically, this June may also be the month the SCOTUS puts the force of law behind these ratings. 

Re: June is Entertainment Ratings & Labeling Awareness Month

Well, technically California wants to impose its own ratings because, as Leland Yee has said eleventy billion times, the ESRB is like the "Fox guarding the henhosue".

Or are you referring to the Court putting the force of law behind the ESRB by declaring California's law unconstitutional?  I can't really tell. 

Re: June is Entertainment Ratings & Labeling Awareness Month

ESRB would be dismantled in Cali if it passes and government ratings will take over. I  think if the bill dies then ESRB would remain as it always was and not have government backed laws.

Re: June is Entertainment Ratings & Labeling Awareness Month

Meaning that the very same problems the motion picture industry faced would happen all over again for the gaming industry.

A lot of movies were stifled because they couldn't market them nationally because individual states and even towns had their own rating boards and in far too many cases outright prevented a movie from being released in their area, making marketing it nationally next to impossible.

I'm guessing that's the entire point of this bill, to induce a chilling effect, which to me is the exact same as a ban. Especially since developers there would likely pack up and leave the state, removing jobs.

Re: June is Entertainment Ratings & Labeling Awareness Month

All of the above are why this law simply will not stand up.  California is essentially relying on Supreme Court justices being sloppy.

Re: June is Entertainment Ratings & Labeling Awareness Month

Actually, California never appealed the section of the law mandating that the "deviant" video games be labeled 18, something that Sotomayor tore into California's lawyer about. 

 
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Papa MidnightIn case anyone is interested, there is a clause written into Section 10 of Windows 10's EULA that provides for a Class Action Waiver, and restricts the user to Binding Arbitration.07/29/2015 - 11:15am
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Andrew EisenMatt - And AGAIN, you keep saying "accountable." What exactly does that mean? How is Gamasutra not accounting for the editorial it published? How is it not accountable to its readership (which, AGAIN, is primarily game industry folk, not gamers)?07/29/2015 - 10:10am
james_fudgeThat's the clean install, for anyone asking07/29/2015 - 9:23am
TechnogeekAlso, it's the upgrade that's available for installation now. You might need to forcibly initiate the Windows Update process before it'll start downloading, though. (If there's a C:\$Windows.~BT folder on your computer, then you're in luck.)07/29/2015 - 8:46am
TechnogeekAdmittedly there's more room to push for an advertiser boycott when you get into opinion content versus pure news, but keep in mind that reviews are opinion content as well.07/29/2015 - 8:46am
TechnogeekMatts: There's a difference between "this person regularly says extremely terrible stuff" and "I don't like the phrasing used in this one specific editorial".07/29/2015 - 8:45am
MattsworknameWait, is that for the upgrade or the clean install only? cause I was gonna do the upgrade07/29/2015 - 8:32am
james_fudgehttps://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows1007/29/2015 - 8:30am
PHX Corp@Wilson, I'm still waiting for My upgrade notice aswell07/29/2015 - 7:57am
MattsworknameWilson: how? Im still waiting for my upgrade notice07/29/2015 - 3:44am
Matthew WilsonI updated to a clean instill of windows 10.07/29/2015 - 2:36am
Mattsworknameargue that it's wrong, but then please admit it's wrong on ALL Fronts07/29/2015 - 2:06am
MattsworknameTechnoGeek: It's actually NOT, but it is a method used all across the specturm. See Rush limbaugh, MSNBC, Shawn hannity, etc etc, how many compagns have been brought up to try and shut them down by going after there advertisers. It's fine if you wanna07/29/2015 - 2:05am
Mattsworknamediscussed, while not what I liked and not the methods I wanted to see used, were , in a sense, the effort of thsoe game consuming masses to hold what they felt was supposed to be there press accountable for what many of them felt was Betrayal07/29/2015 - 2:03am
MattsworknameAs we say, the gamers are dead article set of a firestorm among the game consuming populace, who, ideally, were the intended audiance for sites like Kotaku, Polygon, Et all. As such, the turn about on them and the attacking of them, via the metods07/29/2015 - 2:03am
MattsworknameAndrew: Thats kind fo the issue at hand, Accountable is a matter of context. For a media group, it means accountable to its reader. to a goverment, to it's voters and tax payer, to a company, to it's share holders.07/29/2015 - 2:02am
Andrew EisenAnd again, you keep saying "accountable." What exactly does that mean? How is Gamasutra not accounting for the editorial it published?07/28/2015 - 11:47pm
Andrew EisenMatt - I disagree with your 9:12 and 9:16 comment. There are myriad ways to address content you don't like. And they're far easier to execute in the online space.07/28/2015 - 11:47pm
Andrew EisenMatt - Banning in the legal sense? Not that I'm aware but there have certainly been groups of gamers who have worked towards getting content they don't like removed.07/28/2015 - 11:45pm
 

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