Research: The Life and Death of Apps

June 7, 2011 -

MTV Networks released the results from its "Love 'Em or Leave 'Em: Adoption, Abandonment and the App-Addled Consumer" study, which examines the life cycle of apps, from how consumers find them, and why people keep them or delete them. Culled from responses to a survey of more than 1,300 mobile app users, MTVN uncovered some interesting statistics related to the global app market.

Around 91 percent said apps expose them to new things; 87 percent said apps let them have fun no matter where they are or what they're doing; 77 percent said apps serve as personal assistants; 75 percent claim that apps give them time to relax; 73 say that apps allow time to connect and interact with family and friends; and 70 percent said apps make the rest of life better.

When asked what they would rather give up instead of their favorite app, 69 percent of men said their favorite news source, while 68 percent said coffee. Around 68 percent of women said they would rather go a year without soda and 63 percent would give up their favorite reality show.

On how consumers discover apps, 53 percent said that personal recommendations were important in deciding which apps to download, while 52 percent relied on user reviews and 42 percent said seeing a friend use a particular app was a critical component. Additionally, 47 percent discovered apps via app stores from Apple and Android. For free apps, a higher number of positive ratings drives most consumers (50 percent) to download. The second most-important factor (43 percent) is personal recommendations. For paid apps, price (63 percent) is very important, followed by whether there is a free or lite preview version of the app (49 percent).

TV and movie apps can have a shelf life of just a few weeks (38 percent are deleted in the first three weeks after download), but two-thirds of them (66 percent) are checked at least once a day. When users find an entertainment app that they love two-thirds check their favorite TV or Movie app at least once a day, with nearly half (44 percent) checking it several times a day. And for each time it's open, 45 percent spend more than 10 minutes with their favorite TV or Movie app. For gaming apps, the grace period is a little longer. Fewer than 20 percent of gaming apps are deleted in the first three weeks of ownership. Nearly half (49 percent) of gaming app users check their apps at least several times a day.

While the early stages of the app life cycle are often based on recommendations, the final stages are more personal - claims MTVN. Only 37 percent of entertainment apps and 39 of gaming apps continue to be used because friends use the same apps. For TV and movie apps, ease of use (79 percent) and new content (55 percent) are the biggest reasons consumers will use an app for the long term. Better alternatives (55 percent) and lack of new content (42 percent) will drive a consumer to delete an app.

Gamers look for apps that are challenging (75 percent) and easy to use (73 percent). With gaming apps, more than three-fourths (77 percent) of consumers say they'll delete an app simply after they lose interest. Three-fourths (75 percent) of consumers said it's very important that an app is "entertaining or fun to use," while 62 percent said it's very important that an app "feels good" in terms of its touch screen feel. Finally, half of participants said it's very important that an app "constantly has new things for me to see, read or do." More than eight in 10 (83 percent) said they are "often surprised at how useful an app can become even if I don't initially think this is something I need."

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Should ‘sexism’ factor into a video game’s rating?:

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Andrew EisenIf you missed the HuffPost segment I guested on, the replay is now embedded in the story.11/21/2014 - 6:05pm
Wonderkarphttps://pbs.twimg.com/media/B2__4yZCcAA9Ytp.jpg these look amazing. Peach is the only one I'm tempted to open cause her packaging is bent. get another nonbent one....man. toycollector me and gamecollector me is fighting11/21/2014 - 5:51pm
WonderkarpJust finalized my Smash Bros free Sound Track Order. Also got 4 amiibos and they look fantastic. I'm afraid to open them. they look spectacular!11/21/2014 - 5:45pm
james_fudgeCan we all agree that Andrew cleans up nicely and can go on any program?11/21/2014 - 5:01pm
Wonderkarpthank you for that line, Andrew. alot of great films fail the bechdel test. Gravity fails it and it has a female lead.11/21/2014 - 4:48pm
Andrew EisenAw, thanks James! Well, now I have to drive back to work!11/21/2014 - 4:45pm
Andrew EisenDidn't have a chance to say this on the HuffPost segment but while the Bechdel test is useful as a broad examination of gender representation in media, it's not at all appropriate as a judgement of quality.11/21/2014 - 4:45pm
james_fudgeAndrew you killed it!11/21/2014 - 4:44pm
WonderkarpMadeline Bergman. second female, they never speak of men, just a computer program. it passes the test11/21/2014 - 4:34pm
E. Zachary KnightDoes Other M have more than one woman in it?11/21/2014 - 4:31pm
Wonderkarpyet Metroid Other M, a game where people cried sexist due to the commanding officers restricting Samus, passes the test....11/21/2014 - 4:21pm
Wonderkarpwait...they are using the bechdel test to determine which games are sexist?.....how does that work with a game like Super Mario Bros when there is no Dialogue? test itself is BS. Alien doesn't pass it11/21/2014 - 4:20pm
james_fudgeAndrew Eisen on Ice! Please join in at 4:23 pm et and support our bestie! http://live.huffingtonpost.com/r/segment/sweden-sexism-video-game/546d41cffe344486d400023711/21/2014 - 4:05pm
Matthew Wilsonthose are the same people that said google should pay to list news sites in their news reader, and than accused google of blackmail when google said no and delisted them.11/21/2014 - 4:03pm
Wonderkarpwait....europe can dismantle a company not founded in europe?11/21/2014 - 3:54pm
NeenekoHrm, that does raise interesting questions about anti-trust laws and transnational corporations.11/21/2014 - 3:54pm
Matthew Wilsonhttp://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/11/europes-parliament-poised-to-call-for-a-break-up-of-google/ what is with Europe? good think they dont have the power to do it. worse comes to worse google can block any European country that tries.11/21/2014 - 3:49pm
Andrew EisenFun Fact: Back when it was new, I was linked to that docket by three separate people in the same day. It was submitted as proof of their claim. In all three cases, the docket didn't even address what they were talking about. Did any of them read it?11/21/2014 - 3:00pm
Wonderkarpits not a piece. its just a press docket. its like a wiki11/21/2014 - 2:52pm
NeenekoAnd for not being about feminism, the piece spends a lot of focus talking about it....11/21/2014 - 2:44pm
 

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