GamerLaw Analyzes Scrolls v. Elder Scrolls Situation

August 9, 2011 -

GamerLaw has an in-depth analysis of the Scrolls v. Elder Scrolls situation that was made public last week by Indie developer Mojang - better known as the makers of Minecraft.

Late last week founder Markus "Notch" Persson jumped on Twitter and his personal blog to say that Bethesda had sent him a "cease and desist letter" concerning his upcoming "Scrolls" game, claiming that it would cause brand confusion with its Elder Scrolls series of RPGS - particularly the upcoming Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim. What Persson plans to do at this point is anyone's guess...

The analysis begins with an explanation of trademarks and how game companies tend to use them:

Trade marks are a kind of IP right used primarily to protect the name of your business/products/services. You can use them to stop other people trying to rip you off by copying or imitating you or your business. A well known example of a trade Mark is the famous Apple logo, or say the Tetris logo.

BUT, owning a trade mark doesn't give you exclusive ownership of the thing that's been trade marked, whether it's a name, a logo, a smell (yes, you can trade mark one). It gives you the right to stop another guy IF:

- he is selling identical or similar goods/services in an identical/similar business, AND

- there is a likelihood of public confusion between the two goods/services.

(Caveat: this is the position under English law, which is broadly similar to European laws generally, including the Swedish law to which Mojang is subject - but there may be some differences I'm not aware of).

The post goes on to point out that unless all parts of this "test: are met, the law doesn't recognize a trademark infringement. He then uses an example of a company that uses "apples" to make products like apple pies; no one is going to confuse delicious apple pie with an Apple product like a desktop computer or an iPhone.

So what can the Minecraft developers do at this point? GamerLaw offers three options:

(1) Fight the claim

(2) Capitulate and change the game name

(3) Agree to coexist with Bethesda (ie both use the name Scrolls, potentially in return for Mojang paying Bethesda)

GamerLaw goes on to say that - in a way - Bethesda is doing the right thing:

There's one more key aspect about trade marks you need to know: once you have one, you need to enforce it. There's no point claiming a particular word or phrase etc is vital to your business if you then let everyone use it indiscriminately (that's how the Hoover Company lost their trade marks over their Hoover vacuum cleaners, because they allowed it to become a generic, generally used phrase to describe vacuum cleaners). If you don't protect your trade mark, you risk losing it. This is why we see these kinds of legal letters flying around from time to time.

Finally, they offer some sage advice for anyone developing a game:

- When you next make a game, check the trade mark registries and the Internet for current or forthcoming games with an identical or similar title

- Build trade protection into your game: devise game names, characters etc which are distinctive so that you can trade mark them yourself. Don't just give names to them because they sound cool.

- Once you have a trade mark, you need to protect it rather than just ignore it. Otherwise you risk losing it.

- Remember trade marks do NOT give you exclusive ownership over the thing that's been trademarked: there has to be a sufficient degree of similarity and public confusion for it to be actionable.

- If you can handle this on your own, great, but if in doubt - speak with a friendly lawyer. IP lawsuits have brought down tech companies and developers of all sizes on their own before, so please take them seriously.

You can read the entire thing here. Thanks to Andrew Pfister (@andrewpfister).


Comments

Re: GamerLaw Analyzes Scrolls v. Elder Scrolls Situation

Why aren't people foaming at the mouth over this ridiculous lawsuit?  This is no better than Langdell's "Edge" trademark.  This is just as absurd!  The game is named "Scrolls".  Not "Elder Scrolls", not "Skyrim".  Just a very generic word, "Scrolls".

So what if EA sued somebody who made a game called "Mirrors"?  Would everyone just sit back and say "oh yeah, this is what EA should do.  Totally different then Langdell..."

Re: GamerLaw Analyzes Scrolls v. Elder Scrolls Situation

"he is selling identical or similar goods/services in an identical/similar business"

Card game is similar to video game?

Re: GamerLaw Analyzes Scrolls v. Elder Scrolls Situation

Scrolls is still a video game.  Both games have fantasy settings but that's about it.

 

Andrew Eisen

Re: GamerLaw Analyzes Scrolls v. Elder Scrolls Situation

Actually, it's both.

It's a collectible card game running on the computer. http://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/33260/Minecraft_Developer_Mojang_Reveals_Its_Second_Game_Scrolls.php

I really don't see how there's any confusion between that and Elder Scrolls

 

Re: GamerLaw Analyzes Scrolls v. Elder Scrolls Situation

Yes, I know but the original poster's phrasing implied that he thinks it's purely a physical card game.  It's not, it's a video game.  Oh sure, the genre is still a card battler, that was never in question.

 

Andrew Eisen

Re: GamerLaw Analyzes Scrolls v. Elder Scrolls Situation

No, I'm pretty sure it's a 100% physical card game.

 

(The content below is unrelated gibberish that has been stuck on my commenting account for a couple years and I have absolutely no means to address it.)

 

Re: GamerLaw Analyzes Scrolls v. Elder Scrolls Situation

You're incorrect.

http://gamasutra.com/view/news/33261/GDC_2011_Interview__Mojangs_Jakob_P...

Are you thinking about doing a physical, real game card to accompany the digital release?

JP: We're not saying a definite "no" to that, but it's not something that we're considering during the design process for the game. I think just the fact that we make this game digital and playable online and on handheld phones, we can add things to the game that would be very hard to add to a paper game.

So these are things that we can add to the game to improve the game, because it is a computer driven program, and the computer can manage that for you. We're not going to say that we never will - if the game is successful, and if we have a demand for it we will probably look into it, but it's not going towards the design at the moment.

 

Andrew Eisen

P.S. - I went ahead and removed your signature for you.

Re: GamerLaw Analyzes Scrolls v. Elder Scrolls Situation

(The content below is unrelated gibberish that has been stuck on my commenting account for a couple years and I have absolutely no means to address it.)

If you are referring to the block of text discussing Earthbound DRM, that is your signature. You can remove it and/or change it by clicking your username in the upper right of the web page, clicking the edit tab in the resulting page and make the changes near the bottom of that page.

Re: GamerLaw Analyzes Scrolls v. Elder Scrolls Situation

Excellent writeup of the legal issues around Trademark and how they intertwine with the game industry.  Hopefully stuff like this will help towards undoing some of langdell's damage...

 
Forgot your password?
Username :
Password :

Poll

Will the FCC preempt state laws that limit municipal broadband services?:

Shout box

You're not permitted to post shouts.
Zenemulator...it's not just a slap job that makes "some" work..they do it for each which is why they work so well. I would rather have the quality over just a slap job.07/30/2014 - 5:48pm
ZenMatthew there is a difference between "worked" and "accurate". You play the Nintendo VC titles they play as damn close to the original as possible. The PSP would just run them as best they could, issues and all. And Masked...EACH VC title has their own07/30/2014 - 5:48pm
MaskedPixelanteOnce again, the 3DS already HAS a GBA emulator, it just can't run at the same time as the 3DS OS.07/30/2014 - 4:54pm
Matthew Wilsonyou cant street pass in ds mode ether, and if moders can make a gba emulator that runs very well on the psp as I understand it. you are telling me that Nintendo devs are not as good as moders?07/30/2014 - 4:49pm
Zenperformance. Halo 1 and 2 worked great because they actually did custom work on each of them...just like Nintendo does now lol07/30/2014 - 4:08pm
Zenexisting hardware while the GBA has to be emulated completely. Same reason the 360 couldn't run most Original Xbox games correctly, or had issues because they just did "blanket approach" for their emulation which led to game killing bugs or horrible07/30/2014 - 4:07pm
ZenSora/Matthew: It's not just Miiverse, but the whole idea of streetpass and things like that would be affected if the OS is not running. And just because a 3DS game can be downloaded and run does not mean that GBA can as easily. Those 3DS games use the07/30/2014 - 4:06pm
E. Zachary KnightSleaker, How is that different from every other credit card company targeting high school and college students?07/30/2014 - 1:40pm
Sleaker@EZK - I think some people are concerned beacuse it's a predatory technique targetted toward younger people that don't understand on top of offering the worst interest rates of any retailer around.07/30/2014 - 11:33am
MaskedPixelantehttp://www.joystiq.com/2014/07/30/europe-gets-long-detained-shin-megami-tensei-4-at-cut-price/ "Sorry you had to wait a year for SMT4, would a price cut make it sting less?"07/30/2014 - 10:29am
NeenekoI would hope not. Though it is not unheard of for store specific cards to be pretty good.07/30/2014 - 8:17am
E. Zachary KnightDoes anyone, or at least any intelligent person, expect a retail branded credit card to be anything close to resembling a "good deal" on interest rates?07/30/2014 - 7:13am
SleakerGamestop articles popping up everywhere about their ludicrous new Credit card offerings at a whopping pre-approval for 26.9% APR07/29/2014 - 10:19pm
Matthew Wilsonhttp://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/07/podcasting-patent-troll-we-tried-to-drop-lawsuit-against-adam-carolla/ the podcasting patent troll scum is trying to turn tail and run.07/29/2014 - 9:50pm
MaskedPixelanteOf course it's improved. At launch, Origin was scanning your entire hard drive, but now it's just scanning your browsing history. If that's not an improvement, I dunno what is!07/29/2014 - 8:59pm
Papa Midnighthttp://www.escapistmagazine.com/articles/view/video-games/columns/experienced-points/12029-Has-EAs-Origin-Service-Improved-Any-Over-the-Last-Two-Years07/29/2014 - 8:25pm
Sora-ChanSo it's just a matter of having better emulation software. If it can be done with a 3DS game, with all the memory and what not it takes up, it can be done with a GBA title through emulation.07/29/2014 - 7:30pm
Sora-ChanOther VC titles for the NES and Gameboy had the same setup where you couldn't access the homescreen without quitting out of the game til a later update when those games were released for the public outside of the founder program.07/29/2014 - 7:28pm
Sora-Chanthe 3DS can, and does, run GBA games, as seen by the founder gifts, which included a number of GBA titles. As for running GBA games and still having access to the home screen, I beleive it's more of the game emulation software needs to be updated.07/29/2014 - 7:27pm
Matthew Wilsonthe 3ds already swaps os's with the original ds. plus I dont think people expect miverse interaction when playing a gba game.07/29/2014 - 6:06pm
 

Be Heard - Contact Your Politician