Nival, 38 Studios Join ESA

September 19, 2011 -

Nival and 38 Studios are now members of the Entertainment Software Association (ESA), according to a press release issued by the trade group representing the video game industry in North America.

In case you have been living in a cave, 38 Studios is the development studio founded by former Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling, and also owns Big Huge Games. The company is putting the finishing touches on its first game, Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning, which will be released early next year. The studio is working with such name-brand talent as writer R. A. Salvatore, comic book artist Todd McFarlane and former Elder Scrolls lead developer Ken Rolston.

“At 38 Studios, we create exceptional products through the hard work and vision of our world-renowned artists and programmers,” said Jennifer MacLean, CEO of 38 Studios. “We are eager to join the membership ranks of the ESA and gain the support of an association that is actively promoting the growth and success of our industry.”

PC gamers are more familiar with Nival, who are responsible for such titles as Blitzkrieg, Silent Storm, Etherlords and King's Bounty: Legions. The company is also developing Prime World.

“Nival promotes innovation and creativity among its employees,” said David D Christensen, general manager of Nival’s North American office. “We felt it was an important step in our expansion into North America to include joining the ESA, which is dedicated to protecting the interests of video game developers and fostering creativity. We anticipate a fruitful partnership as we develop and publish innovative games for a wide audience of players.”

“These companies are at the forefront of our industry, leveraging the vast experience and talent of their creative teams to develop and publish quality entertainment enjoyed by gamers around the world,” said Michael D. Gallagher, president and CEO of the ESA. “We look forward to working with these companies as we further our mission to fight piracy, protect the First Amendment liberties of video games, and position our industry for future growth.”

Source: IndustryGamers

 

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Re: Nival, 38 Studios Join ESA

"...and former Elder Scrolls lead developer Ken Rolston."

Hey, is that that card game the Minecraft guy is doing?

 

Andrew Eisen

 
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InfophileRelevant to this site: http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/015984.html#015984 - Apparently allowing comments to be downvoted leads to worse behaviour09/22/2014 - 6:18am
Andrew EisenMP - I love that game but damn my squadmates are bozos.09/21/2014 - 10:05pm
MaskedPixelanteSWAT teams should be banned until they; 1. Learn not to walk into enemy fire, 2. Learn to throw the flashbang INTO the doorway, not the frame and 3. Stop complaining that I'm in their way.09/21/2014 - 9:53pm
Craig R.I'm getting of the opinion that SWAT teams nationwide should be banned. This probably isn't even the most absurd situation in which they've been used.09/21/2014 - 9:26pm
Andrew EisenAnd, predictably, it encouraged more parody accounts, having the exact opposite effect than what was intended.09/21/2014 - 7:07pm
E. Zachary KnightThis is called a police state people. When public officials can send SWAT raids after anyone for any offense, we are no longer free.09/21/2014 - 6:41pm
E. Zachary KnightJudge rules SWAT raid tageting parody Twitter account was justified. http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/sep/19/illinois-judge-swat-raid-parody-twitter-peoria-mayor09/21/2014 - 6:41pm
MechaTama31quik: But even if it did break, at worst it is only as bad as the powder. Even that is assuming that it is dangerous through skin contact, which is not a given if its delivery vehicle is a syringe.09/21/2014 - 4:30pm
MaskedPixelantehttp://www.forbes.com/sites/insertcoin/2014/09/20/isis-uses-gta-5-in-new-teen-recruitment-video/09/21/2014 - 4:25pm
quiknkoldSyringes can break. And in a transcontinental delivery, the glass could've broken when crushed. I work in a mail center. Shit like this is super serious09/21/2014 - 3:25pm
E. Zachary KnightIt doesn't matter what is inside the needle. As long as it requires him to take the step of purposefully injecting himself, the threat of the substance is as close to zero as you can get.09/21/2014 - 1:27pm
quiknkoldEzach: I'm not talking about the needle. I'm talking about what's inside. Geeze. Depending on what it is, the sender could be guilty of bioterrorism.09/21/2014 - 12:51pm
E. Zachary Knightquiknkold, No. That syringe is not worse than white powder or a bomb. The syringe requires the recipient to actually inject themselves. Not true for other mail threats.09/21/2014 - 12:49pm
Andrew EisenThe closest to a threat I ever received was a handwritten note slipped under my door that read "I KNOW it was you." Still no idea what that was about. I think the author must have got the wrong apartment.09/21/2014 - 12:28pm
InfophileThat's what they call it? I always called it hydroxic acid...09/21/2014 - 11:57am
MaskedPixelanteProbably dihydrogen monoxide, the most dangerous substance in the universe.09/21/2014 - 10:14am
james_fudgewell I hope he called the police so they can let us all know.09/21/2014 - 9:07am
quiknkoldIt's pretty gnarly. Depending on what it is, it could be worse than white powder or a fake bomb.09/21/2014 - 9:06am
james_fudgeI just looked it up on UPS.com09/21/2014 - 8:56am
james_fudgeand expensive for an American to ship to London.09/21/2014 - 8:55am
 

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