Canada Pushes for DMCA-Style Law

September 30, 2011 -

The government of Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper has resubmitted a revision of the Canadian digital copyright law (C-11) to Parliament. The bill is being described by Canadian media as pretty much the same as the previous bill submitted by Harper's government the last time. This time the bill will probably pass.

That bill, C-32, died on the vine when the 2010 Parliament dissolved without formally voting on it. Like the last bill the biggest problem with the new bill are the provisions regarding digital locks. Like our Digital Millennium Copyright Act, this bill aims to introduce DRM anti-circumvention provisions that make a variety of activities naughty.

"Our Government received a strong mandate from Canadians to put in place measures to ensure Canada's digital economy remains strong," declared James Moore, Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages as he introduced the announcement of law C-11—The Copyright Modernization Act. "This bill delivers a common-sense balance between the interests of consumers and the rights of the creative community."

Even though critics hate the bill, they concede that the government will get its way this time around and the bill will be passed.

"After years of false starts, it is clear that this copyright bill will pass, likely before the end of the year" says Canadian law professor Michael Geist. "While there is much to like in the bill, the unwillingness to stand up for Canadians on digital locks represents a huge failure. Moreover, it sends the message that when pressed, Canada will cave."

But the biggest push for the law isn't from Canadian lawmakers - it's from the White House, as revealed by a WikiLeaks cable that showed our government lobbying Canada to commit to stronger IP enforcement.

The bill says that digital locks can only be hacked for law enforcement and national security activities, reverse engineering in the name of software compatibility, security testing, encryption research, for the protection of personal information, for temporary recordings made by broadcast undertakings, access for persons with perceptual disabilities, and unlocking a wireless device.

The bill at least allows consumers to unlock their mobile devices to change carriers but this will not override any agreements between consumers and their service providers. The bill also says that the government will retain the right "through regulatory power, to provide new exceptions to the digital lock prohibition to ensure access where the public interest might be served or where anti-competitive behavior arises."

The law puts considerably more pressure on ISPs to deal with accusations of copyright infringement. It compels all ISPs to participate in a "notice and notice" system where an ISP will receive a notice from a copyright owner that one of its subscribers is infringing. The ISP will be required to forward that notice to the subscriber and to keep a record of the identity of the alleged infringer. ISPs that fail to retain such records or to forward notices will face civil damages.

The bill also adds exemptions for journalists, artists, librarians, and educators including fair dealing exemptions for things such as parody and satire, performer and production copyright protection for sound recordings extended to 50 years from the time of publication or performance, protection for non-commercial Internet mash-ups, protections for using copyrighted material in classrooms, and a new provision to allow librarians to digitize content and electronically send it to patrons via interlibrary loan.

Source: Ars Technica


Comments

Re: Canada Pushes for DMCA-Style Law

I love how the article fails to mention that the reason that it will pass through unopposed this time is because we only have one house in Canada and it is controlled by a majority of Conservative (that name makes no sense with them...)

Re: Canada Pushes for DMCA-Style Law

"Then they came for the Jews,
and I didn't speak out because I wasn't a Jew.

Then they came for me
and there was no one left to speak out for me."


Copyright infringement is nothing more than civil disobedience to a bad set of laws. Let's renegotiate them.

---

http://zippydsm.deviantart.com/

Re: Canada Pushes for DMCA-Style Law

Dear ¢anada, Un¢le $am want$ to $ay hi and wel¢ome to the 21-¢entury.

Re: Canada Pushes for DMCA-Style Law

You horrible weasels, you received no mandate from the public; you received demands from media corporations. And by trying to push this shlock for your own benefit, by means of payoffs or 'political favors', you are destroying the little integrity that is left in our political system.

I don't know what disgusts me more these days: The Conservative party and their relentless pursuit of corrupt, self serving politics, or; the uninformed, fear-motivated Canadian public that foolishly gave them a majority government in the last election. Bleh.

 
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Andrew EisenMP - I love that games but damn my squadmates are bozos.09/21/2014 - 10:05pm
MaskedPixelanteSWAT teams should be banned until they; 1. Learn not to walk into enemy fire, 2. Learn to throw the flashbang INTO the doorway, not the frame and 3. Stop complaining that I'm in their way.09/21/2014 - 9:53pm
Craig R.I'm getting of the opinion that SWAT teams nationwide should be banned. This probably isn't even the most absurd situation in which they've been used.09/21/2014 - 9:26pm
Andrew EisenAnd, predictably, it encouraged more parody accounts, having the exact opposite effect than what was intended.09/21/2014 - 7:07pm
E. Zachary KnightThis is called a police state people. When public officials can send SWAT raids after anyone for any offense, we are no longer free.09/21/2014 - 6:41pm
E. Zachary KnightJudge rules SWAT raid tageting parody Twitter account was justified. http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/sep/19/illinois-judge-swat-raid-parody-twitter-peoria-mayor09/21/2014 - 6:41pm
MechaTama31quik: But even if it did break, at worst it is only as bad as the powder. Even that is assuming that it is dangerous through skin contact, which is not a given if its delivery vehicle is a syringe.09/21/2014 - 4:30pm
MaskedPixelantehttp://www.forbes.com/sites/insertcoin/2014/09/20/isis-uses-gta-5-in-new-teen-recruitment-video/09/21/2014 - 4:25pm
quiknkoldSyringes can break. And in a transcontinental delivery, the glass could've broken when crushed. I work in a mail center. Shit like this is super serious09/21/2014 - 3:25pm
E. Zachary KnightIt doesn't matter what is inside the needle. As long as it requires him to take the step of purposefully injecting himself, the threat of the substance is as close to zero as you can get.09/21/2014 - 1:27pm
quiknkoldEzach: I'm not talking about the needle. I'm talking about what's inside. Geeze. Depending on what it is, the sender could be guilty of bioterrorism.09/21/2014 - 12:51pm
E. Zachary Knightquiknkold, No. That syringe is not worse than white powder or a bomb. The syringe requires the recipient to actually inject themselves. Not true for other mail threats.09/21/2014 - 12:49pm
Andrew EisenThe closest to a threat I ever received was a handwritten note slipped under my door that read "I KNOW it was you." Still no idea what that was about. I think the author must have got the wrong apartment.09/21/2014 - 12:28pm
InfophileThat's what they call it? I always called it hydroxic acid...09/21/2014 - 11:57am
MaskedPixelanteProbably dihydrogen monoxide, the most dangerous substance in the universe.09/21/2014 - 10:14am
james_fudgewell I hope he called the police so they can let us all know.09/21/2014 - 9:07am
quiknkoldIt's pretty gnarly. Depending on what it is, it could be worse than white powder or a fake bomb.09/21/2014 - 9:06am
james_fudgeI just looked it up on UPS.com09/21/2014 - 8:56am
james_fudgeand expensive for an American to ship to London.09/21/2014 - 8:55am
E. Zachary KnightThat is pretty scary. Would have been worse if it were a fake bomb or white powder.09/21/2014 - 8:49am
 

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