Microsoft Teams with Sesame Workshop, NatGeo for Kinected Education

October 19, 2011 -

Microsoft has teamed up with such brands as Sesame Street, National Geographic, and leading academics and learning research institutions to deliver new ways to learn using the Xbox 360 and its full-body motion sensing technology to deliver new ways to learn for young children.

Working with Sesame Workshop and National Geographic, Microsoft's initial "playful learning" experiences —"Kinect Sesame Street TV," "Kinect Nat Geo TV" and code-named "Project Columbia" — promise to "inspire kids and their parents to get off the couch and into the action, working cooperatively with their favorite characters to have fun and learn at the same time."

"We know that the most effective learning environments for children are those that are engaging and exciting, and that foster collaboration and a positive attitude toward learning," said Alex Games, Ph.D. curriculum and learning sciences expert and educational design director for Microsoft. "With the controller-free magic of Kinect, we can encourage kids to use their motor skills and to learn using their body in immersive experiences. This new way to play allows children to learn by interacting with their favorite characters and engage with content in novel ways."

Xbox 360 is also filming a season of interactive shows in partnership with Sesame Street called “Kinect Sesame Street TV." This new show will offer interactive versions of shows from the current television season, new content written and filmed just for Kinect and access to classic clips from the "Sesame Street" archive.

"Sesame Workshop and Microsoft are committed to producing rich engaging content in a new media platform for children who will have positive educational experiences," said Rosemarie Truglio, PhD, vice president Education and Research, Sesame Workshop. "This partnership is an opportunity to combine the interactive platform of Kinect with Sesame Workshop's 42 years of innovative and research-based approaches to educational content. This new media experience allows for meaningful learning — leveraging kids' gross motor abilities by creating exciting, gesture-based movements that allow them to connect with our characters and content."

"Nat Geo WILD is an ideal partner for Kinect, turning passive television viewing into a creative, immersive experience where kids and families can actually interact with our unique content," said Brad Dancer, senior vice president of Digital Media and Research, National Geographic Channels. "By partnering the stories, images and information from Nat Geo WILD with the Kinect platform, we are pushing the boundaries of traditional television and gaming to help inspire and train the next generation of explorers."

Another project code-named "Project Columbia," is being designed in collaboration with the Sesame Workshop Curriculum Team. Microsoft claims that it encourages a love for books and changes the way children read. The new portal allows children to play an active role in bringing stories to life — interacting with words and illustrations and immersing them in the story.

Microsoft also revealed a partnership with the New York University-based Games for Learning Institute, a joint research endeavor bringing together game designers, computer scientists and education researchers to pursue the art and science of educational games. Applying education theory and research-based models of learning, Games for Learning Institute researchers are examining the intersection between Kinect play and children's learning. These studies and collaborations with experts will determine the best ways in which Kinect experiences can be optimized to create content that is both fun and academically enriching, according to Microsoft.


 
Forgot your password?
Username :
Password :

Shout box

You're not permitted to post shouts.
SleakerGamestop articles popping up everywhere about their ludicrous new Credit card offerings at a whopping pre-approval for 26.9% APR07/29/2014 - 10:19pm
Matthew Wilsonhttp://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/07/podcasting-patent-troll-we-tried-to-drop-lawsuit-against-adam-carolla/ the podcasting patent troll scum is trying to turn tail and run.07/29/2014 - 9:50pm
MaskedPixelanteOf course it's improved. At launch, Origin was scanning your entire hard drive, but now it's just scanning your browsing history. If that's not an improvement, I dunno what is!07/29/2014 - 8:59pm
Papa Midnighthttp://www.escapistmagazine.com/articles/view/video-games/columns/experienced-points/12029-Has-EAs-Origin-Service-Improved-Any-Over-the-Last-Two-Years07/29/2014 - 8:25pm
Sora-ChanSo it's just a matter of having better emulation software. If it can be done with a 3DS game, with all the memory and what not it takes up, it can be done with a GBA title through emulation.07/29/2014 - 7:30pm
Sora-ChanOther VC titles for the NES and Gameboy had the same setup where you couldn't access the homescreen without quitting out of the game til a later update when those games were released for the public outside of the founder program.07/29/2014 - 7:28pm
Sora-Chanthe 3DS can, and does, run GBA games, as seen by the founder gifts, which included a number of GBA titles. As for running GBA games and still having access to the home screen, I beleive it's more of the game emulation software needs to be updated.07/29/2014 - 7:27pm
Matthew Wilsonthe 3ds already swaps os's with the original ds. plus I dont think people expect miverse interaction when playing a gba game.07/29/2014 - 6:06pm
MaskedPixelanteBut that's not the issue, the 3DS is perfectly capable of emulating GBA games. The problem is that it doesn't have enough available system resources to run it alongside the 3DS OS, and thus it doesn't have access to stuff like Miiverse and save states.07/29/2014 - 5:45pm
Matthew WilsonI am well aware that it requires more power, but if a GBA emulator could run well on a original psp, than it should work on a 3ds.07/29/2014 - 5:36pm
ZenThe reason the SNES could run Gameboy, or the Gamecube could run GBA was because their adapters included all of the necessary hardware to do it in the respective add-ons. The systems were just conduits for control inputs and video/sound/power.07/29/2014 - 4:51pm
ZenMatthew: Emulation takes more power than people realize to run a game properly. You can make something run on less, but Nintendo...as slow as they are at releasing them..makes them run as close to 100% as possible. Each game has its own emulator for it.07/29/2014 - 4:47pm
Matthew Wilsonkind of hard to believe since the 3ds is atleast as powerful as the gamecube hardware wise.07/29/2014 - 4:27pm
MaskedPixelanteYes, the 3DS has enough power to run 16-bit emulators, but not at the same time it's running the 3DS systems themselves. You could run the games, but you wouldn't get save states or Miiverse.07/29/2014 - 4:04pm
InfophileRunning GBA on 3DS shouldn't be hard. The DS had flashcarts sold for it that added just enough power to emulate GBA and SNES games, so the 3DS should have more than enough natively.07/29/2014 - 3:37pm
MaskedPixelanteIt's a bunch of people whining about boycotting/pirating Trails in the Sky FC because XSEED didn't license the Japanese dub track, which consists of about 10 lines per character.07/29/2014 - 11:27am
Sleaker@MP - devolver Digital issued a twitter statement saying they would replace the NISA pledge.07/29/2014 - 10:57am
E. Zachary KnightIs that a discussion about RIAA member music labels?07/29/2014 - 10:48am
MaskedPixelantehttp://steamcommunity.com/app/251150/discussions/0/43099722329318860/ In this thread: Idiots who don't understand how licensing works.07/29/2014 - 9:20am
MaskedPixelantehttp://www.joystiq.com/2014/07/28/gaymerx-in-dire-straits-after-nis-america-allegedly-backs-out-of/ NISA backs out of GaymerX support, but it seems like the only people crying foul are GaymerX.07/29/2014 - 6:30am
 

Be Heard - Contact Your Politician