Justice Department Abandons Changes to Freedom of Information Act

November 4, 2011 -

The U.S Justice Department has backed off proposed changes to the Freedom of Information Act after strong public criticism to the changes, and a collective verbal lashing from lawmakers on both sides of the political spectrum. Lawmakers felt that proposed changes gave the DOJ a license to lie to citizens who were looking for information from the government.

At issue was a proposal that gave the agency the ability to say that information "did not exist" if an agency determined that said information was classified in nature.

The wording from that proposal read: "the component utilizing the exclusion will respond to the request as if the excluded records did not exist. This response should not differ in wording from any other response given by the component."

The DOJ officially threw in the towel on Thursday.

"Having now received a number of comments on the Department's proposed regulations in this area, the Department is now actively considering those comments and is reexamining whether there are other approaches to applying exclusions that protect the vital law enforcement and security concerns that motivated Congress to exclude certain records from the FOIA and do so in the most transparent manner possible," DOJ legislative liaison Ronald Weich wrote in a letter to Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), one of the lawmakers who questioned the proposal.

"The Justice Department decided that misleading the American people would be wrong, and made the right decision to pull the proposed regulation. The American people are increasingly cynical with the federal government, and increasing transparency can be an important tool to build more trust,” Grassley said.

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) also issued a statement:

"I commend Attorney General Holder and the Obama administration for promptly withdrawing the Department’s proposed rule on the treatment of requests for sensitive law enforcement records," Leahy wrote. "It is essential to carefully balance the public’s right to know and government’s need to keep some information secret. The Justice Department’s decision to withdraw this proposal acknowledges and honors that careful balance, and will help ensure that the American people have confidence in the process for seeking information from their government."

Source: Politico


 
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Wonderkarpgranted, 2 of those instances are sited sources, and the rest is divided between 2-3 different stories11/21/2014 - 2:24pm
E. Zachary KnightWow. Quinn's name shows up 33 times, but it isn't about her.11/21/2014 - 2:21pm
Wonderkarpalso Activision makes me sad with that. Glitchs are hilariously fun(so long as they dont happen 100% of the time)11/21/2014 - 2:18pm
WonderkarpHe's one of the 5 men linked to Zoe Quinn. works at Kotaku. Kind of an ass11/21/2014 - 2:18pm
Andrew EisenHe's a games journalist.11/21/2014 - 2:13pm
Michael ChandraWho is Nathon Grayson?11/21/2014 - 2:07pm
MaskedPixelantehttps://twitter.com/BroTeamPill/status/535841124884418560 Source.11/21/2014 - 1:49pm
Andrew EisenFun Fact: Zoe Quinn's name shows up in that GamerGate press docket 33 times! Nathon Grayson's name? Only eight. Guess which one's the game journalist.11/21/2014 - 1:48pm
MaskedPixelanteApparently Activision is issuing copyright strikes against streamers who show off CoD glitches. Out now but I'll source when I get home.11/21/2014 - 1:22pm
Andrew EisenIf you see something you think we should cover, let us know!11/21/2014 - 1:11pm
WonderkarpAnd the GamerGate Girls Huffington Post Video should have been on this site weeks ago http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/10/15/female-gamers-gamergate_n_5990310.html11/21/2014 - 12:46pm
Wonderkarpits not getting dropped, Monte. Its become a defiant cry in the face of adversity and lies11/21/2014 - 12:42pm
Wonderkarphttp://press.gamergate.me/dossier/ The GamerGate Press Site. All the Information and Evidence that supports their arguments and goals. This is the 5th time I've posted this.11/21/2014 - 12:40pm
MonteIts why i feel that they would be better off dropping the gamergate tag. The tag is far to tainted and they attract the anti-fem trolls. Find a new tag, loose the baggage and then you can have a discussion on journalism free of distractions11/21/2014 - 12:40pm
WonderkarpGG got together and put together a press site that contains all their evidence and arguements in a single easy FAQ. I've posted it here many times to silence.11/21/2014 - 12:36pm
MonteIt does seem like GG spends more time trying to defned itself from accusations than actually talking about journalism; hence one reason why they keep coming back to the topic of feminists despite them having nearly nothing to do with gaming journalism11/21/2014 - 12:36pm
Wonderkarpwhat do you mean "Their own fault"? are you saying its Gamergates fault that the 11 dead gamer articles were written? that it was GamerGates fault when they got together to cry out that they were shouted down by louder megaphones?11/21/2014 - 12:35pm
NeenekoThere is unity of attack, and unity of defense, but not of message or identity. Which the group's own defensiveness has blinded to them since it is chalked up to 'media is out to get us' as opposed to their own fault.11/21/2014 - 12:10pm
NeenekoOh unity I will give you, it is one of the group's weakest points.11/21/2014 - 12:07pm
WonderkarpI dont think so. There's a lot of Unity in Gamergate. OPSkynet has only strengthend the group and brought people together. and I spent a couple months "Gorillas in the Mist"ing the group11/21/2014 - 11:54am
 

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