MPAA Admits (Sort of) to Drafting SOPA, Protect IP Acts

December 1, 2011 -

The New York Times Media Decoder blog has an interesting story about Michael O’Leary the senior executive vice president for global policy and external affairs of the Motion Picture Association of America. While the story is about toning down SOPA to address "legitimate concerns," the real story is something that opponents knew all along: the MPAA and friends are basically the authors of the bill. This explains why one of its key supporters, Senator Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) basically said during hearings that he didn't understand some of the technical aspects of the bill he was pushing for. He would probably know more about it if he'd actually had a hand in drafting it in the first place.

"We will come forward with language that will address some of the legitimate concerns" of technology companies such as Google and Yahoo that have opposed the Stop Online Piracy Act in the House, and the Protect IP Act in the Senate, O’Leary said.

That short sentence speaks volumes about who is writing this legislation and how in bed our government is with special interest groups like the MPAA and RIAA. While O’Leary claims that "those who were pushing the legislation" have been huddling with members from both houses of congress and both political parties to address objections raised by Google, Yahoo and others, the companies that actually raised the objections are not a part of those meetings.

But it's easy to tell that the MPAA does not plan on addressing any of the serious concerns that the general public has about either bill:

"It’s all rhetoric and there are no proposals," he said of the opponents to the bills. "From where I sit, it’s hard to see that as anything but a pretext for running out the clock and preserving the status quo."

O’Leary believes that an anti-piracy/rogue web sites bill will eventually become law, though he admits that it will be an uphill battle. Those that oppose it hope it is the hardest battle they ever have to fight.

Source: NYT by way of TechDirt. Thanks to RedMage for the tip.


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Re: MPAA Admits (Sort of) to Drafting SOPA, Protect IP Acts

 
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E. Zachary KnightIt doesn't matter what is inside the needle. As long as it requires him to take the step of purposefully injecting himself, the threat of the substance is as close to zero as you can get.09/21/2014 - 1:27pm
quiknkoldEzach: I'm not talking about the needle. I'm talking about what's inside. Geeze. Depending on what it is, the sender could be guilty of bioterrorism.09/21/2014 - 12:51pm
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InfophileThat's what they call it? I always called it hydroxic acid...09/21/2014 - 11:57am
MaskedPixelanteProbably dihydrogen monoxide, the most dangerous substance in the universe.09/21/2014 - 10:14am
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quiknkoldIt's pretty gnarly. Depending on what it is, it could be worse than white powder or a fake bomb.09/21/2014 - 9:06am
james_fudgeI just looked it up on UPS.com09/21/2014 - 8:56am
james_fudgeand expensive for an American to ship to London.09/21/2014 - 8:55am
E. Zachary KnightThat is pretty scary. Would have been worse if it were a fake bomb or white powder.09/21/2014 - 8:49am
quiknkoldThere's some more tweets regarding it with more pictures09/21/2014 - 8:09am
quiknkoldMilo Yiannopoulos was mailed a syringe filled with clear liquid. He claims it's anti gamergate harassment. Mentioned on his twitter twitter.com/Nero/status/51366668391625523209/21/2014 - 8:07am
Andrew EisenNow, having said that, what sites are you reading that are claiming that if "you self-identify as a Gamer, you're immediately the problem" or that gamers are "obligated to stop harassment"? Or was that hyperbole too?09/21/2014 - 1:03am
Andrew EisenFirst of all, ONE person in the Shout box suggested an obligation to call harassers out on their harassing but only after YOU brought it up. Plus, Techno said "when you see it happening." If you don't see it, you're not under any obligation.09/21/2014 - 1:02am
Sleaker@Craig R. - at this point I don't even know what the hashtags are suppsed to be in support of. what does GamerGate actually signify.09/21/2014 - 12:21am
Sleaker@AE - Hyperbole for the first 2, but it seems like some of the comments in the shout are attempting to place blame on fellow gamers because they aren't actively telling people to stop harassing even though they don't necessarily know anyone that has.09/21/2014 - 12:16am
Andrew EisenSleaker - Who the heck are you reading that is claiming "all gamers are bad," we "need to pass laws or judgement on all gamers," that if "you self-identify as a Gamer, you're immediately the problem," or that gamers are "obligated to stop harassment"?09/20/2014 - 9:44pm
erthwjimhe swatted more than just krebs, I think he swatted 30 people http://krebsonsecurity.com/2014/05/teen-arrested-for-30-swattings-bomb-threats/09/20/2014 - 9:31pm
Craig R.Btw, the guy who swatted security expert Brian Krebs? He got picked up recently. It can be done.09/20/2014 - 8:55pm
 

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