MPAA's Chris Dodd Extends Olive Branch to Tech Industry

February 24, 2012 -

The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) is trying to extend an olive branch to the tech industry after taking a beating publicly over PIPA and SOPA. MPAA President Chris Dodd told an audience on Wednesday that Hollywood is "pro-technology and pro-Internet," but warned that the fight over piracy was far from over. Dodd added that "a strong system of copyright protection for online content is critical to the continued success of the flourishing Internet marketplace." Dodd made his comments at the Atlanta Press Club on Wednesday, according to Reuters.

He went on to claim that nearly one-quarter of Internet traffic relates to copyright theft and that the proliferation of sites outside the U.S. are the cause of most of this traffic.

"We are not talking about overzealous film buffs or political activists making a statement about freedom of information," Dodd told the crowd. "We are talking about criminals."

He also tried to answer criticism that the entertainment industry is lazy and that it can't innovate to make money.

"We cannot draw up a business model that accounts for the wholesale theft of our product," he said. "It's true for pharmacies. It's true for the automobile industry. It's true for software developers. And it's true for us."

He also added that the entertainment industry cannot survive without the innovations that are constantly being created by the tech industry. He also claimed the copyright laws helped make the Internet we now enjoy possible.

He also mentioned several companies that support the industry's efforts to protect their copyrighted and trademarked goods including the UFC and Gibson Guitars.

"The coalition supporting a crackdown on ... criminal sites includes companies large and small who produce movies, TV shows, music, software, photography, prescription drugs, consumer electronics -- everyone from Gibson Guitars to the Ultimate Fighting Championship."

In closing, Dodd said that freedom of speech and the ability to innovate does not require a license to steal.

"If you believe that freedom of speech does not imply, and the ability to innovate does not require, a license to steal, if you believe that the men and women who work hard to make films and TV shows deserve to be fairly compensated ... I invite you to join this coalition and help us move towards a solution to this problem."

Source: Reuters


Comments

Re: MPAA's Chris Dodd Extends Olive Branch to Tech Industry

Hey Chris Dodd,

Why don't you start backing companies doing it for you every day legally. Netflix, Vudu, Hulu, etc are all above the table and you try to fuck with them every chance you get.

Put your money where your mouth is FAT CAT.

Re: MPAA's Chris Dodd Extends Olive Branch to Tech Industry

He went on to claim that nearly one-quarter of Internet traffic relates to copyright theft and that the proliferation of sites outside the U.S. are the cause of most of this traffic.

I would doubt that even 1/512 of Internet traffic relates to "copyright theft," because that is the theft of the actual copyright.

"We are not talking about overzealous film buffs or political activists making a statement about freedom of information," Dodd told the crowd. "We are talking about criminals."

Criminals have better ways to make money - such as drugs.

He also tried to answer criticism that the entertainment industry is lazy and that it can't innovate to make money.

The criticism is true.

"We cannot draw up a business model that accounts for the wholesale theft of our product," he said. "It's true for pharmacies. It's true for the automobile industry. It's true for software developers. And it's true for us."

They don't have to.  They have to draw up a business model that accounts for the fact that people don't want their product anymore.

He also added that the entertainment industry cannot survive without the innovations that are constantly being created by the tech industry.

It can't survive with those innovations either.  Did the buggy whip survive with the innovation that is the car?

He also claimed the copyright laws helped make the Internet we now enjoy possible.

The Internet is possible despite copyright laws, not because of them.

He also mentioned several companies that support the industry's efforts to protect their copyrighted and trademarked goods including the UFC and Gibson Guitars.

How many millions of dollars were said companies paid by the RIAA and MPAA?

"The coalition supporting a crackdown on ... criminal sites includes companies large and small who produce movies, TV shows, music, software, photography, prescription drugs, consumer electronics -- everyone from Gibson Guitars to the Ultimate Fighting Championship."

Again, how many millions of dollars in bribe money were spent?  No sane person would support a crackdown on "criminal sites" such as the Library of Congress.

In closing, Dodd said that freedom of speech and the ability to innovate does not require a license to steal.

The only true statement in Dodd's entire monologue.  But ask yourself this: Did GM and Ford have a "license to steal" from the buggy-whip manufacturers?  Or did GM and Ford just out-compete the buggy whips?

 

What the MPAA and RIAA are afraid of is not piracy, but competition!  They are framing it as a piracy issue that does not exist in order to cover up their own illegal dealings!

Re: MPAA's Chris Dodd Extends Olive Branch to Tech Industry

*MPAA's Chris Dodd (D) Extends Olive Branch to Tech Industry

Re: MPAA's Chris Dodd Extends Olive Branch to Tech Industry

No, sorry. He's no longer a representative. I'm pretty sure most people on this site will agree that big money's corruption is pretty across the board.

Re: MPAA's Chris Dodd Extends Olive Branch to Tech Industry

Ok, I need to be blunt here, does that really fucking matter?

Re: MPAA's Chris Dodd Extends Olive Branch to Tech Industry

I think Hollywood is in fact pro-technology.

They're just utterly anti-consumer, particularly when it comes to consumers who use technology.

Re: MPAA's Chris Dodd Extends Olive Branch to Tech Industry

"He also added that the entertainment industry cannot survive without the innovations that are constantly being created by the tech industry"

Then why aren't you using a good chunk of them to help with distribution?

Re: MPAA's Chris Dodd Extends Olive Branch to Tech Industry

Something stinks. It must be that massive load of bullshit that Dodd just dropped!

"We are not talking about overzealous film buffs or political activists making a statement about freedom of information," Dodd told the crowd. "We are talking about criminals."

Criminals? Really? If what you mean by criminals are people that violated civil law, then he'd be right. However copyright is a civil law and criminal charges only apply in specific situations. He's just trying to stir up the people into a moral panic that benefits his position, as well as distorting the facts.

"We cannot draw up a business model that accounts for the wholesale theft of our product," he said. "It's true for pharmacies. It's true for the automobile industry. It's true for software developers. And it's true for us."

Pure bullshit. It's not a product and it's not theft. Producers of physical goods do not have to deal with the kind of disruption of the distribution model as the copyright industry has to. People don't typically steal products from the manufacturers. This is a gross failure to admit the entertainment companies provide a service, not a product. That's why they're having so much trouble dealing with people interfering with their distribution monopoly.

"He also added that the entertainment industry cannot survive without the innovations that are constantly being created by the tech industry. He also claimed the copyright laws helped make the Internet we now enjoy possible."

The first part is right. Their industry needs technology innovations. However, the second part is a flat-out lie. What made the internet possible was technology. Mesh-based networking, world wide web, and other technology are what made the internet possible. Copyright only tries to limit what it was made to do.

"The coalition supporting a crackdown on ... criminal sites includes companies large and small who produce movies, TV shows, music, software, photography, prescription drugs, consumer electronics -- everyone from Gibson Guitars to the Ultimate Fighting Championship."

This is ridiculous. He knows how weak his position is that he has to try conflating counterfeiting with copyright infringement. He's trying to ride piggyback on counterfeiting to gain greater penalties for copyright infringement that it does not merit.

"If you believe that freedom of speech does not imply, and the ability to innovate does not require, a license to steal, if you believe that the men and women who work hard to make films and TV shows deserve to be fairly compensated ... I invite you to join this coalition and help us move towards a solution to this problem."

All art is speech and copyright censors that, whether it's your speech or the speech of another you're passing on. His call to action is biased, ignorant, and full of false dilemma fallacies. If you really care about art and artists, demand that people like Chris Dodd, the MPAA, and the RIAA are given a pink slip. People need to know that art is a service and once people starting treating it as such, there will be no need for copyright because artists will be paid for what they really provide people: Their skill and time.

-Greevar

"Paste superficially profound, but utterly meaningless quotation here."

Re: MPAA's Chris Dodd Extends Olive Branch to Tech Industry

"...entertainment companies provide a service, not a product."

Where did that idea come from?  Did you come to that conclusion yourself or did you hear it somewhere else and decided to adopt it?

Not looking for an argument, just curious as I've never heard anyone else espouse such a belief.

 

Andrew Eisen

Re: MPAA's Chris Dodd Extends Olive Branch to Tech Industry

Art is speech, which is the act of passing on ideas and information (it's also protected under the first amendment, so that makes sense). I think we can logically agree to that. Since artists speak to people through their art, it's a service they provide. You trade your money for them to express their ideas to you. That's a service. It's just as much as service as paying a speaker to give a presentation or paying a teacher to teach. Those are services. Anything where someone passes on ideas and information to others for pay is in a service industry. Artist are selling expressions, which is an action. Selling action (i.e. labor) is a service.

When you think about it, it makes sense logically and economically. As a service, "piracy" isn't an issue since they aren't selling goods that they need to control and can't control. They sell labor instead, which is completely at their control. If they give away the results of their labor (after payment is rendered), people will distribute it to others using their bandwidth, at no cost to the artist. The customers promote the artist's work by sharing it. Free distribution, free publicity, and a business model that ensures payment for services rendered. The artist only needs to maintain a connection with the audience and produce the art that they want. What's even better, people can vote with their money what art they want made. Artists work directly for their audience rather than a publisher telling them what to make (i.e. CoD MW 10 or Twilight: The Next Generation).

-Greevar

"Paste superficially profound, but utterly meaningless quotation here."

Re: MPAA's Chris Dodd Extends Olive Branch to Tech Industry

That's not what I asked.  I know what your view is, you've shared it many, many times.  What I'm interested in knowing is where it came from or if it's a greevar original.

 

Andrew Eisen

Re: MPAA's Chris Dodd Extends Olive Branch to Tech Industry

I think it was mostly from Nina Paley the animator, Rick Falkvinge respected blog journalist, and Mike Masnick the economist who runs the blog TechDirt. It also comes from my years of reading studies, articles, economics, copyright law, alternative business models, and logical reasoning. So it's a little of both. It's not just me though. I have seen others whom have expressed the same thought on the matter.

-Greevar

"Paste superficially profound, but utterly meaningless quotation here."

Re: MPAA's Chris Dodd Extends Olive Branch to Tech Industry

"He went on to claim that nearly one-quarter of Internet traffic relates to copyright theft and that the proliferation of sites outside the U.S. are the cause of most of this traffic."

One quarter?  Holy biscuits!  That's incredible!

Uh, you do have tangible evidence to back that claim with, right?  Right?

Hello?

 

Andrew Eisen

Re: MPAA's Chris Dodd Extends Olive Branch to Tech Industry

He is most likely refering to a bandwidth study released some time in the last year. In it, it was claimed that P2P traffic accounted for roughly 25% of bandwidth used in the US. However, that P2P traffic was not broken down into legal and illegal uses.

Interestingly enough, the same study said that Netflix traffic accounted for roughly the same percentage.

Re: MPAA's Chris Dodd Extends Olive Branch to Tech Industry

Likely ignoring that legitimate uses like Steam probably took a good chunk of that

Re: MPAA's Chris Dodd Extends Olive Branch to Tech Industry

I certainly hope not or I might have to headdesk with gusto.

 

Andrew Eisen

Re: MPAA's Chris Dodd Extends Olive Branch to Tech Industry

*cooks an egg on that burn*

Re: MPAA's Chris Dodd Extends Olive Branch to Tech Industry

I would point out Gibson resended it's support for SOPA and it's Senate counter part PIPA. Also it isn't much of an olive branch as they're not interested in any conversation unless it's in support of SOPA style laws, and when the tech industry offered to talk they said no because it looked like the law was going to pass. After opposition to SOPA called into question SOPA's passage and the offered to talk was made again with the suggestion that it be a public discussion they once again said no thanks cause they perfer backroom dealings.

Re: MPAA's Chris Dodd Extends Olive Branch to Tech Industry

If they discussed it publicly, we might have something to say, and the public having something to say on this is a big No-no for SOPA/PIPA;s supporters.

 
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