Cisco Cloud Service TOS Doesn't Want You To Download Porn, Copyrighted Material

July 5, 2012 -

An article on Ars Technica details how an automatic update to Cisco routers added cloud support that required users to agree not to download pornography and copyrighted material. Luckily the article also describes how to roll that update back to an older version of the firmware so you can go back to using web-based router management.

The author (Jon Brodkin) bought a Cisco Linksys EA3500 dual-band wireless router, but shortly after his purchase an automatic firmware update (which also affected the EA4500 and EA2700 router models) redirected those trying to connect to the old browser-based internal administrative Web interface to Cisco's new Connect Cloud service. The cloud-based service lets you administer your router from anywhere, which seems like a good idea only if you are a network administrator responsible for a large number of users. The merits of its usefulness aside, the worst thing about the cloud service is its terms of service:

You agree not to use or permit the use of the Service: (i) to invade another's privacy; (ii) for obscene, pornographic, or offensive purposes; (iii) to infringe another's rights, including but not limited to any intellectual property rights; (iv) to upload, email or otherwise transmit or make available any unsolicited or unauthorized advertising, promotional materials, spam, junk mail or any other form of solicitation; (v) to transmit or otherwise make available any code or virus, or perform any activity, that could harm or interfere with any device, software, network or service (including this Service); or (vi) to violate, or encourage any conduct that would violate any applicable law or regulation or give rise to civil or criminal liability.

While we are not responsible for any content or data that you choose to access or otherwise use in connection with the Service, we reserve the right to take such action as we (i) deem necessary or (ii) are otherwise required to take by a third party or court of competent jurisdiction, in each case in relation to your access or use or misuse of such content or data. Such action may include, without limitation, discontinuing your use of the Service immediately without prior notice to you, and without refund or compensation to you.

Naturally Cisco router owners were not pleased by these items in the TOS. Recently Cisco said that the company is not tracking what customers do with their internet connection:

"Cisco Connect Cloud does not actively track, collect or store personal info or usage data for any other purposes, nor is it transmitted to third parties."

Still, many consumers wanted a way to return to the old web-based system. If you are a consumer affected by these changes, check out the rest of the Ars Technica article for a walkthrough on how to roll back that automatic update and return to a system that doesn't care what you are consuming online.

Source: Ars Technica

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Comments

Re: Cisco Cloud Service TOS Doesn't Want You To Download ...

I really don't read the TOS that way. You aren't allowed to put porn on the cloud service, which since it currently doesn't allow uploading, is moot. They put boilerplate terms in for a service like Drop Box and don't support it yet.

 
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