Poll Results: Should Corrupt Politicians Be Put To Death?

April 16, 2014 - GamePolitics Staff

Last week we asked our readers: "Should corrupt politicians face different penalties for breaking the law?" You voted, and the majority of those votes concluded that politicians should face a more severe punishment than regular average citizens might face. Around 47 percent of voters said that they should face a more severe punishment; while 18 percent said that politicians should be hung (the plain way of saying they should face the death penalty). Tough crowd.

Around 35 percent of voters said politicians should face the same punishment as anyone else if convicted, and a mere one percent said they should be treated with a less severe punishment.

Thanks to everyone who voted in last week's poll. Since this week's SuperPAC podcast has been delayed in observance of the Easter holiday, you'll have to wait until Monday, April 21 to hear Andrew Eisen and E. Zachary Knight discuss the poll.

It should also be noted that we are not sadists; this poll was in response to a California State Senator proposing a bill that would force corrupt politicians to face the penalty if convicted of particular egregious crimes against California citizens. Leland Yee's name came up in that discussion for obvious reasons...

"Vote" image © Shutterstock.com.

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Comments

Re: Poll Results: Should Corrupt Politicians Be Put To Death?

I agree with Robert Heinlein's idea that punishment should be proportional to rank.

Re: Poll Results: Should Corrupt Politicians Be Put To Death?

I voted for "more severe punishments" simply because they're elected officials and they ultimately make the laws that everyone has to abide by, therefore they are and should be held to a higher standard than a regular citizen.

For example, 2 years ago, the NFL suspended New Orleans Saints head coach Sean Payton for the entire season over an assistant coach allegedly paying players "bounties" to "deliberately injure" opposing players even though it really turned out to be nothing more than a bunch of meathead locker room talk(whether the punishment was justified or fair or not is still up for debate to this day) simply because he was the head coach and "he should have known."

Geaux Saints, Geaux Tigers, Geaux Pelicans. Solidarity for the Saints = No retreat, no surrender. 2013 = Saints' revenge on the NFL. Even through the darkest days, this fire burns always.

 
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